30th November (1918)

Last day of November (brains!).  A long arduous day.  Rising at 5am. we had fed up and breakfast before dawn.  In the saddle all day, pulling up after dark in a small village about 5 kilos. beyond the town of Bavay.   Bavay looked interesting with it’s spires and its leafless trees.  Astonishing sites in the way of refugees returning from exile in Belgium and Germany.  Our host in Escarmain, an old chap, not an inhabitant, was drifting back after 4 years in exile.  He had 11 including 7 soldier sons, none of whose whereabouts or safety was he aware.

Sunday (24 November 1918)

Jull and I sat shivering on a railway embankment, sketching the village.

You should have seen how everyone stared.  One officer took us by surprise from behind with a humorous pretence of arresting us – he was candidly puzzled.

Sketch by Lincoln Lee - Quievy - 24 Nov 1918

[Image: Lincoln Lee, ‘Quievy’, dated 24 November 1918.  The Artillery had rejoined the NZ Division at Quievy on 13 November, and spent until 28 November getting ready for the march to Germany]

Setch by Lincoln Lee, Quievy, Nov 1918

[Image: Lincoln Lee, ‘Quievy, Nov. 18’]

20th November (1918)

The grand review lasted until after 1pm, a tiresome and useless affair.  Every day we witness the repatriation of French civilians – many of them returning from such places as Maubeuge, where they had been sent on, or back from more Southern towns, whither they had fled.  They plod along, shoving all kinds of hand carts; with donkey – or dog carts – or without cart at all, lumping their remaining possessions in bags and bundles.  What speculations they must entertain, as to whether their homes will be ruined, damaged or intact.  Their privations must be and have been severe.  But there is an air of renewed hope about them – their country is free and victorious and “L’heur de gloire est arrive!”.

nlnzimage 12-013776-G NZ Troops parading Solesmes, late Nov 1918

[Image: New Zealand Division leaving the town of Solesmes, France, after the armistice ending World War I. Shows an army band leading a column of marching troops through a cobbled street. Photograph taken around late November 1918 by Henry Armytage Sanders.  Alexander Turnbull Library, Wellington. Ref. 1/2-013776-G]

Tuesday 19th (November 1918)

Tomorrow the whole division has to parade for our coming mach to Rhineland – confound Rhineland!

Have been to a friendly tea given by the Y.M.C.A.  We had small plates of strawberries and cream!  The Irish chap (Rowley) whose acquaintance I made at the rest camp near Bus was there and sang a couple of songs – he has a good voice.  Half of the crowd left as soon as they had eaten everything in reach.  There are some “beauties” in the army.  Life is growing monotonous.  Please consider that the show is over and that I am only pulling down the curtains and dusting the seats.  Everything has become deplorably uninteresting to me as this rough record must have become to you.  I continue it only because I know you wish to follow my movements.

Sunday 17th (November 1918)

Church Parade in a protestant church, very little damage, in which our raucous voices reverberated powerfully.  “For those at Sea” was pitched too high on the wheezy harmonium, but we overcame that by ringing the changes from base to tenor and tenor to basso, producing withal a turbulent and not un-oceanic effect.

Nemesis has found me out and I must stump up 24/8d. – railway fare Torquay to London.

16th November (1918)

Freezing day; the frost remaining on the ground throughout.  They keep us going from dawn to dark.  Apparently the only thing of real importance after beating the Bosche is to clean the harnesses.

Wherever we spend the winter, its terrors will be minimised by the knowledge that it is our last on this side of the world.

nlnzimage 1-2 013782-G NZ Troops watering mules, Solesmes, Nov 1918

[Image: New Zealand Division Transport watering mules at Solesmes, France. Photograph taken ca late November 1918 by Henry Armytage Sanders. Alexander Turnbull Library, Ref: 1/2-013782-G]